Collaborations

Nocturnal Suns

Nocturnal Suns is an exhibition of four faculty members from the UT School of Art.

UT Downtown Gallery

106 S. Gay Street
Knoxville, TN 37902

December 1, 2017 – January 6, 2018

The Warp Whistle Project is humbled to be in such good company!

Emily Ward Bivens is an Associate Professor of 4D arts and Time-Based Art at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She received her MFA from The University of Colorado, Boulder in 2004. Bivens uses found and made objects to forge narratives, provoke or encourage interaction, and reveal fictional and non-fictional mysteries. These objects shift from prop to subject to evidence when used in performance, video, and installation. Characters or identities are created to act as subjects, authors, inventors, and curators of the work.

John C. Kelley is an Assistant Professor of 4D and Time-Based Arts at the University of Tennessee Knoxville. His video work has screened domestically at venues such as The Mid-America Arts Alliance (Kansas City, MO), the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (Bentonville, AR) the Arizona International Film Festival (Tucson, AZ), The Front (New Orleans, LA), the Index Art Center (Newark, NJ), Living Arts (Tulsa, OK), internationally in cities such as London, Moscow, Berlin, Sao Paolo, Mexico City, Edinburgh, Vienna, Prague, Amsterdam and others. Kelley has written original music for award winning feature length narrative and documentary films through Gray Picture in St. Louis, MO, released music as a solo artist through King Electric Records in Austin, TX, and has appeared on more than 25 recordings and albums

John Douglas Powers studied art history at Vanderbilt University and earned his MFA in sculpture, with distinction, at The University of Georgia. His work has been featured in The New York Times, World Sculpture News, Sculpture Magazine, Art Forum, The Huffington Post, Art in America, The Boston Globe and on CBS News Sunday Morning. He is the recipient of the 2013 Virginia A. Groot Foundation Award, a Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant as well as a Southeastern College Art Conference Individual Artist Fellowship, an Alabama State Council on the Arts Fellowship, and the Margaret Stonewall Wooldridge Hamblet Award. Powers currently lives and works in Knoxville, Tennessee and is Assistant Professor of Sculpture at The University of Tennessee.

The Navigator

The Warp Whistle Project is working hard on a cross-disciplinary performance piece that will debut on January 21st at the Caplan Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia. Commissioned by the Network for New MusicThe Navigator will feature performers from the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. 

Special thanks to the University of the Arts School of Music and School of Theater for aiding in the facilitation of set design/construction, lighting, sound design, interactive electronics, documentation, and promotion. 

 From Asa Smith's  Illustrated Astronomy , 1848

From Asa Smith's Illustrated Astronomy, 1848

About the work

The Navigator is a hybrid work of art: a staged collision of sonic and visual information.  The visual components are inspired by Asa Smith’s 19th century astronomical illustrations: outdated planetary charts that served a didactic purpose for his readers. Additional source materials include 1950s science fiction stage sets, clock parts, and mythological scientific instruments. Tensions between the hand-made and the mechanical, illusion and artifice, and function and futility, positions The Navigator as an amalgamation of past representations of ideological futures. Similar to make-believe, the viewer is consumed by an experience on the verge of rupture.  

As The Navigator performs its various functions, its true purpose remains enigmatic.  While every journey has a destination, The Navigator’s priority is the voyage.  In “Wind Up”, the music is energetic and intricate, influenced by strains of minimalism, yet the question of mechanical malfunction begins early on as kinks enter into the clockwork precision.  “Unlock” is an hypnotic journey through nocturnal spaces - pointillistic starbursts of sound map a course out of the darkness and into the light.  In the final leg, once a tenuous signal is established, The Navigator is ready to “Transmit” to its final destination.

In context

In day to day life, we put the material world to use: cars, coffee makers, and cell phones, to name a few.  These objects are typically defined by the unique purpose they serve: cars take us places, coffee makers fuel the morning routine, and cellphones . . . do most of the rest.  However, philosophers have argued that we never truly see these objects for what they actually are until they break. A broken cellphone no longer able to serve any of its myriad purposes, can be seen for what it truly is: a chocolate-bar-sized piece of glass and aluminum housing an intricate array of precious metals and circuit boards.  Without a purpose, the object’s techne is revealed.  

Historically, art objects have served the purpose of glorifying the spiritual, entertaining the masses, and representing ideals of truth, beauty, and power. . In the early years of the 20th century, with the wheels of modernity in full swing, the purpose, appearance, and function of western art was set on a new course. No longer fixated on mimesis, artists began working in opposition to the dominant trend that art should copy nature. As The Navigator charts its own 21st century voyage, its destination remains a question and, in doing so, imparts something else about its true nature.

From the Network for New Music:

You won’t want to miss this unique, cross-disciplinary performance, where you will hear and see "The Navigator", a new multi-media work by composer Paul Schuette and visual artist Mary Laube, side-by-side in U. of Arts state-of-the-art black box theater. The Network Ensemble will also respond to iconic graphic scores by William Kraft and Gyorgy Ligeti/Rainer Wehinger.

Advance ticket sales: $20 Regular/15 senior/10 student (at the door; $25/20/10)
University of the Arts students and faculty FREE ADMISSION

 

Teasers:

Czong Institute of Contemporary Art

The Warp Whistle Project has a piece in the Yellow Book International Exhibition at the Czong Institute of Art in Gimpo, South Korea. 

CICA Museum’s art book project “Art Yellow Book” provides a unique art space for artists. Unlike gallery spaces, art books are portable and ubiquitous. Unlike online media, books are tactile and “real.” Art Yellow Book aims to create a space where individual artists can freely express themselves and become media themselves.

Art Yellow Book features artists from around the world. Each artist freely organize two facing pages in the book, using these pages as an exhibition form and an advertisement for themselves and their work. There are no rules or restrictions regarding the layout, design, or content. If you would like to know more about the artists, visit their websites by scanning their QR codes, or contact them directly by email.

The Art Yellow Book International Exhibition Summer 2016 features 32 international artists who participated in Art Yellow Book #2. The exhibition will be held from July 1st to 17th, 2016, featuring Photography, Video Art, and Digital Art. --CICA 

Flowers

International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA)

The Warp Whistle Project was invited to present at this years International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA) in Hong Kong. Paul Schuette will be presenting our most recent project Nightly Light from Suns, an installation piece developed during our collaborative residency at the Virginia Center for Creative Arts in 2015. 

Abstract: 

Nightly Light from Suns merges visual art and technology to explore the notion of Nostalgic Futurism, a yearning for a time when it was possible to imagine a corporeal, tangible technological future, uncomplicated by knowledge of the current moment. The handcrafted materials and antiquated electronic sounds are reminiscent of 1950’s science fiction, reigniting a promising dream of what lies ahead. Visions of the future cannot escape the ideologies of the present moment. Similar to the nature of memory, these projections are romanticized ideations, born from a longing to “be elsewhere.” To facilitate this unhinging from the present, we experiment with the relationship between sonic and visual information by staging various points of intersection. Nightly Light from Suns represents an otherworldly intelligence that implies an unknown and advanced functionality. These unmapped qualities of the work renew a positive sense of longing and wonder about the future that seems to be all but a memory of the past. 

About ISEA:

Founded in the Netherlands in 1990, ISEA International (formerly Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts) is an international non-profit organisation fostering interdisciplinary academic discourse and exchange among culturally diverse organisations and individuals working with art, science and technology. The main activity of ISEA International is the annual International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA). The symposia began in 1988.

 

The Warp Whistle Project at VCCA

The Warp Whistle Project returned to the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts for a four week residency in Amherst. 

 

About the Warp Whistle Project: